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If you are hospitalized for COVID-19, the mortality rate skyrockets

Once a case of COVID-19 becomes serious enough for hospitalization, the mortality rate increases to 10%, according to Allscripts medical data. This is largely due to the presence of other health issues, namely kidney disease.

This mortality rate goes up by age, with the Washington Post reporting that hospitalized COVID-19 patients over the age of 85 have a four in 10 mortality rate, while the much younger set from 0 to 54 have a mortality rate of less than one in ten. 

Compare that to the world’s mortality rate for the coronavirus. As of April 20, the globe’s overall rate was 6.9% globally and 5.4% in the U.S.

According to a study conducted in New York, 88% of people who had to be placed on a ventilator while in the hospital eventually died.

Most cases of COVID-19 will be mild to moderate, with symptoms resembling a bad cold or flu for previously healthy patients with no underlying medical conditions. Other conditions that have been shown to exacerbate the symptoms of COVID-19 include heart disease, respiratory diseases such as asthma, and diseases that compromise the immune system such as Lyme disease.

Should you go to the hospital if you think you have COVID-19?

This, by no means, is an indication that going to the hospital for treatment of severe cases of COVID-19 alone increases the likelihood of mortality. 

The data from Allscripts indicates that underlying health issues increase the likelihood of hospitalization. If a case of COVID-19 is severe enough to necessitate hospitalization, it increases the risk of mortality due to severity alone, with hospitalization being an indicator of that severity. 

Those most at risk for mortality resulting from COVID-19 are the elderly with underlying health conditions, but that doesn’t mean young people aren’t at risk for the disease. If you begin to show symptoms of the virus, contact your healthcare provider to see what your options are. 

Sources: Washington Post, Allscripts, CDC, Live Science


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